Commercial Law Update - High Court grants special leave to the Commissioner in CGT/liquidators case

Commercial Law
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Last week the High Court granted special leave to the Commissioner to appeal the decision of the Full Court of the Federal Court in Commissioner of Taxation v Australian Building Systems Pty Ltd (in liq) [2014] FCAFC 133. For my discussion of the first instance decision of Logan J, see my earlier post here.

It will indeed be interesting to see the High Court’s decision on this, after the appeal is heard. For those interested, the transcript of the special leave hearing may be read here. It can be seen that the Commissioner emphasised several matters in oral submissions, including the Commissioner’s propounded construction of section 254 of the ITAA 1936, and what the Solicitor-General described as “the radical differences” between sections 244 and 255, the construction of the latter having been decided previously by the High Court in Bluebottle UK Ltd v Deputy Commissioner of Taxation [2007] HCA 54; (2007) 232 CLR 598. The High Court’s decision in Bluebottle was relied on heavily by the primary judge in his reasoning.

In oral submissions, the Solicitor-General advanced the argument that section 254(1)(a) creates a taxation liability in the trustee or agent. This, of course, is directly contrary to what the Full Federal Court had held. See, for instance, at [25]where Edmonds J observed (with whom Collier and Davies JJ agreed):

That s 254 is a “collecting section” and has no operation to render a trustee liable to be assessed to tax if the trustee is not otherwise liable to be assessed under the provisions of Div 6 of Pt III of the 1936 Act, comes out of two more recent High Court authorities.

The Solicitor-General argued that this taxation liability he said is created by s 254(1)(a) is ancillary to the primary liability which will rest somewhere else in the Act, he acknowledged. But he submitted that it was a true creation of a liability as well as then being a collection mechanism. He submitted that s 254(1)(b) makes that liability more explicit, that the trustee or agent must lodge returns and “be assessed thereon” in the representative capacity. And, so he submitted, then the critical paragraph (d), which is the collection mechanism, should be read in the light of what has gone before so that it is an authority and duty to “retain from time to time out of any money which comes to him or her in his or her representative capacity so much as is suffficient to pay tax which is or will become due in respect of the income, profits or gains.

*To view Carrie Rome-Sievers' blog, Developments in Insolvency and Commercial Law, or to sign up to receive an email notification each time a new post is published, please click here

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Carrie is a commercial law barrister practising primarily in the areas of insolvency and corporations law as well as equity and trusts, bankruptcy, contract, restitution, and banking and finance

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